UK CEO: Pushing ‘Healthy’ Food At McDonald’s Bad For Business

Filed under: Business — @ October 19, 2006


Easterbrook wants McDonald’s to stop focusing on salads

One of the most recognized name brands is the #1 fast food company in the world: McDonald’s. It’s hard to imagine anyone on this planet who has never heard of the famous golden arches, Ronald McDonald, or what they have become most well-known for–Quarter Pounders, Big Macs, French fries and milkshakes.

Following positive financial news about the company last week, corporate executives quickly rolled out their PR swagger by stating the upcoming release of nutritional info on their packaging as well their healthier menu items (which Dr. Dean Ornish helped encourage McDonald’s to add to their menu) were the reason for the resurgence in sales as well as the outstanding performance of the UK chain of McDonald’s restaurants.

But somebody forgot to send the memo to the CEO of the 1,125 McDonalds restaurants in Great Britain. His name is Steve Easterbrook and despite the improved sales numbers and the public perception that McDonald’s really does care about offering better food choices for their customers, Easterbrook said all the focus on these “healthy” menu items that have been added in recent years such as salads and fruit is actually bad for business.

“In the past we have seemed somewhat apologetic about who and what we are, but you have to believe in the brand,” Easterbrook remarked. “Our menu has evolved, and we now have a much broader range of salads and sandwiches. But we were alienating customers by pushing our salads.”

Click here to read what Easterbrook thinks McDonald’s should be actively promoting and marketing to the buying public to make the most profits (it shouldn’t surprise you!).

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